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Social Studies 8 - 100th Battalion: Start Here

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Kakesako, Gregg K. "America at Last Honors 22 Asian-American Heroes with the Nation's Highest Award for Valor in Combat." Honolulu Star - Bulletin, Jun 21, 2000. , https://search.proquest.com/docview/412262259?accountid=136515

Kakesako, Gregg K. "New Center to Replace Clubhouse." Honolulu Star - Advertiser Nov 04 2011 ProQuest. 9 Mar. 2018 https://search.proquest.com/docview/902232417/49E5336C0F0544E4PQ/1?accountid=136515
In 1942, while the soldiers were at Camp McCoy, Wis., the dream was to have "a clubhouse with a bar, a bowling alley, dancing pavillionsic], ping pong tables, a cozy room for bull sessions, and a nice soft bed to lie on after a hard night," according to the unit's newsletter. The 100th Battalion, while an independent entity, was honored with three Presidential Unit Citations, Purple Hearts,  Congressional Medals of Honor,  Distinguished Service Crosses, Silver Stars,  Bronze Stars and Division Commendations.

"Preserving Memories of the 100th Battalion." Honolulu Advertiser Jun 17 2007 ProQuest. 9 Mar. 2018 https://search.proquest.com/docview/194153337/49E5336C0F0544E4PQ/12?accountid=136515
The 100th Infantry Battalion -- dubbed "One Puka Puka" and later absorbed by the better known 442nd Regimental Combat Team -- was the first all-Japanese-American battalion comprising volunteers from Hawai'i. During the next few months, nisei soldiers were discharged or segregated out of their units, and more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans -- most of them U.S. citizens and more than half children -- were relocated to internment camps surrounded by barbed wire and guarded by armed soldiers.